Sunday, March 27, 2011

Minneola Orange Posset with Lime Whipped Cream - Weekend Herb Blogging # 276

Orange Posset with Lime Cream

It's been weeks now, and I am more than weary of winter. Winter, you say? But it's the end of March, spring is official, and the fine pastel hazes of early blossoms are as soft on the eyes as fuzz feels on a peach. So there it is: I want a peach. The peaches, however, are wanting, too. Their recent debut from South America can only be described as ragtag. It's a remarkable feat of nurture versus nature that a fruit can be at once hard and bruised at the same time. The bramble berries, though admirable enough, are at a price which reminds one of extortion. And that tatty storage apple in my crisper can only be salvaged by sticking clove pins in it like a voodoo doll to fashion a pomander. Calling me cranky would be very diplomatic of you. Calling me sour would be complimentary.

I'll accept sour, thank you. You can make that oranges and limes, if you please, although nearly any juicy sacs of citrus will do for this recipe, a gentle and simple pudding of ancient provenance from across the pond, as old as that pomander. At its most modern adaptation, a posset crosses the fragility of panna cotta with the dense creaminess of classic curd, achieved with neither gelatin nor eggs. I've used Minneola orange (actually a tangelo of tangerine-grapefruit breeding) with its spirited undercurrent of unusual and elusive lime essence, topped with a spoonful of real-lime cream. It's just the sort of sweet and easy dessert that can put a sweet and easy smile on even the most stubborn of sour pusses.

Minneola Orange Posset with Lime Whipped Cream - Adapted from the Lime and Lemon Posset recipe by Jill Dupleix on Epicurious

Serves 4.


Ingredients

2 cups heavy cream
3/4 cups superfine sugar
6 tablespoons fresh Minneola orange juice, strained of pulp and pits


Method

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, stir the cream and sugar together with a whisk. (Sugar will dissolve almost instantly.) While continuously stirring, bring mixture to a boil of moderate bubbling. Regulate heat carefully for next 3 minutes, maintain a constant bubbling. Remove from heat. Stir in juice. Cool for 10 minutes. Stir again to dissolve any skin that may have formed on top. Pour into 4 1/2-cup custard cups, champagne glasses, or other serving vessels. Cover loosely with plastic wrapped, avoiding the surface of the mixture. Chill in refrigerator for at least 4 hours. Serve plain or with dollops of lime whipped cream.


Lime Whipped Cream
(Generic recipe)

Ingredients

1/2 cup whipping cream
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons piping gel (optional, to stabilize and facilitate piping; I used a product with agar gum rather than gelatin, which can be found in the cake-decorating aisle of craft stores)
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, strained of pulp
1 fractional drop of green food coloring, enough to coat the end of a toothpick (optional)


Method

With an electric hand or stand mixer, beat cream until thickened, adding the sugar incrementally. Continue beating until cream is stiff. Beat in lime juice and food coloring. Adjust for sweet/sour balance by beating in tiny amounts of extra lime juice or superfine sugar. Dollop or pipe cream onto posset servings.

Minneola Posset with Lime Whipped Cream

This recipe is for Cinzia of Cindystar, hosting Weekend Herb Blogging #276, an event created by Kalyn of Kalyn's Kitchen, now presided over by Haalo of Cook Almost Anything at Least Once.


Been There, Done That ~
Lemon Curd Shortbread
Cappuccino Canap├ęs
Cardamom Apple Custards


Other People's Eats ~
Mineola Marmalade from An Endless Banquet
Frosted Orange Rolls from Food for a Hungry Soul
Lime and Ginger Posset from The English Kitchen

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Congratulations to....

Joanne
of Hearth and Hospitality, the winner of the recipe journal. Of the 36 comments, Joanne was randomly drawn as the chronological 19th of 33 qualifying participants. I will be in touch with Joanne to make arrangements to send her prize out.

RandomGeneratorMoleskine

Thank you very much, everyone, for your well wishes. In an attempt to make up for lost time, I hope to post quite a bit before now and end of March, with a delicate sweet scheduled next. As soon as that's in the can, I'll brew a large pot of tea and settle in for some blog-hopping.

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Now I am Four - An Anniversary and Giveaway

The Well-Seasoned Cook turns four this month. Although personal affairs and projects have kept me quietly away from this space for the last few weeks, there are several recipes in the works which will be featured here before March closes out. Since I've never celebrated any previous blog milestones with bright lights and a booming band, it's more than time to gratefully acknowledge my readers, without whom this creative space I've eked out for myself would have remained just for myself - and as we know, nearly everything is more fun when you share it. Thank you all for your continuing comments and camaraderie. They always mean a great deal to me, and I look forward to many more years of enjoying your company whether you are visiting here or I click on over to your part of the planet for a taste of your talents. The world gets smaller every day. Thanks again for being a part of it.


As a small token of my regard for you, I am offering a giveaway for a very nifty recipe journal for one lucky winner. (F.T.C. Notice: I have no business connections with Moleskine. Linking to the website is strictly for illustrative purposes. This purchase was made by me without influence with this giveaway in mind. I am also paying for the worldwide shipping of it.)

Participation is easy. Please leave a comment by Friday, March 25, 11:59 p.m. New York time. I will select a random winner and announce on Saturday, March 26. The drawing is open to anyone, whether you blog or not, as long as you are not a personal friend or family member. To those who normally comment anonymously, I will need a full first name and at least the first letter of your surname in order to identify you should you be the winner.

Good Luck and See You Very Soon!

Image: Microsoft Office Clip Art