Friday, October 29, 2010

No Frills Friday - Pink Satin Applesauce for Weekend Herb Blogging #257

Pink Velvet Applesauce

Go on. You can admit it: you lugged home just as many fresh fall apples from the farm stand as you did pumpkins to carve for Halloween. Well, I know I did. What to do with them, what to do? Apple pie, of course, is always nice and seasonally appropriate, but devilishly disastrous on your waistline given the buttery, crumbly, flaky platform of pastry that it requires. And that platform of pastry can be just as devilish in another way, too, if you want to do your pie justice with a crust that will be buttery, crumbly, and flaky.

Since all apples need to be cored and seeded regardless of recipe, and most require peeling, I opted for an easy pot of my mother's applesauce, tinted naturally pink from the red peelings, then whirred in the blender to create a silky texture and satiny shine that adds just a little extra oomph for your festive holiday table. You may be tempted to use Red Delicious since they are among the most handsomely red of all apples in the marketplace today, but their beauty is quite literally only skin deep; they are bred for maximum eye appeal and shelf life rather than outstanding flavor. Consider, instead, Jonathan, Stayman, Braeburn, McIntosh, or Macoun. With a little sugar added to the cooking water, these varieties taste so much like candy that you may not even miss that apple pie.

Pink Satin Applesauce – My mother's recipe, reproduced with her permission (original source, if any, unknown)

Serves 4-6.

Ingredients

1 cup water
Scant ½ cup sugar (optional; I used brown)
4 pounds fresh, unblemished red-skinned apples (choose those fruit that are the most deeply red; colors can vary even from same harvest)
1 large bowl cold water acidulated with the juice of 1 lemon
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon or nutmeg to top finished sauce (optional)

Method

Arrange a large saucepan with 1 cup water and optional sugar on stove top. Wash apples under running water. Transfer to cutting board. Core and quarter each apple, removing any errant seeds. Discard cores and seeds. Peel quarters, slipping them into acidulated water to prevent browning. Drop peelings into saucepan with water. Drain off acidulated water from prepared apples. Add apples to peelings in saucepan. Turn on burner to low heat to prevent apples from scorching as they render their own liquid and become softer. Stir occasionally; it will be easier to mix apples with peelings as apples become mushier. If apples are very watery, you can increase heat to medium-low. You will, however, need some liquid to facilitate blending; apples should not be too dense and “dry.” Sauce is ready when peelings have faded to a dull beige. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Spread cool sauce onto large platter or plate. Pick out the peels and discard them. Transfer sauce to blender container. Whir in bursts until sauce is smooth and shiny. Transfer to serving/storage bowl. Dust with optional spice. Refrigerate leftovers.

This recipe is for Chriesi of Almond Corner, hosting Weekend Herb Blogging #257 for Haalo of Cook Almost Anything at Least Once.


I do apologize for not being around much these last few weeks. Work and other obligations have left little time and energy for blogging pleasures. I will be catching up with your recipes as soon as possible. I know that I have missed a great deal of good cooking and baking.


Been There, Done That

Baked Mutsu Apples
Apple Bundt Cake
Cardamon Apple Custard


Other People's Eats

Crockpot Applesauce

Plum Applesauce
Frozen Applesauce
Ancho Chile Applesauce
Cranberry Applesauce


14 comments:

Rosa's Yummy Yums said...

Lovely apple sauce!

Cheers and Happy Halloween,

Rosa

Simona said...

I thought about you the other day, when I stocked on the first Mutsu apples of the season ;) Your apple sauce has a really lovely color. Hope your workload eases up a bit so you can enjoy some pumpkin-carving fun.

Johanna GGG said...

what a beautiful photo - it took me a while to read your post because I took so long admiring the picture - and then I was admiring the ingenuity of the colour from the apple skins and the smoothness of the applesauce

Lisa said...

What a charming post and such a beautiful image. I wish I was next door and could share this lovely creation.

Kathy said...

I looove your recipes and can't wait to get to the store tomorrow to get supplies! About a month ago, I read The China Study and haven't touched a piece of meat since! That's saying a lot because I'm getting up there in years and this is a new deal for me....I have a bunch of recipes of my own that I love but just this week they started to get repetitive. It's so nice to find fresh ones. Thank you!!

Kathy at:
RetirementRainbow.blogspot.com

I have your site linked into my blog. I love it.

Joanne said...

Whenever I indulge in homemade applesauce, I am reminded of just how superior it is to storebought. This sounds gloriously delicious and it definitely does look like silky satin.

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