Monday, December 24, 2007

Sugar High Friday - Rose Rice Pudding

Yakh-dar-Behesht - Ice in Heaven
Ground rice, ground almonds, a scattering
of bleeding-heart rose petals, a Persian paradise.

Ice in Heaven - Adapted from the Diana Henry recipe on Shaun's excellent recommendation

Ingredients

55g (2oz) ground rice
15g (1/2 oz) ground almonds
80g (3 oz) superfine (not powdered) sugar
375ml (13 fl oz) milk
45ml (3 tbsp) whipping cream
60 ml (4 tbsp) rosewater
juice of half a lime
Fresh or candied rose petals, lime zest, pistachios and/or mixed berries for garnish

Method

In a large saucepan, combine rice flour, ground almonds and sugar, cooking over very low heat until thickened and gently bubbly, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon or whisk. If mixture becomes too thick, add incremental amounts of additional milk. Cook for another five minutes. Remove from heat then stir in whipping cream, rosewater and lime juice. Adjust sugar to taste. Pour into individual bowls or glasses. Decorate with optional garnishes. Refrigerate until cool and firm. Serves 2 generously. --


This post is being submitted to Zorra of Kochtopf, hosting December's installment of Sugar High Friday # 38 for Jennifer of Domestic Goddess, creator of this wildly popular monthly blogging event.

18 comments:

  1. Gorgeous looking pudding or Kheer as we call it in India. Great entry. I haven't seen Rose extract here, must get it from World market next week.It's easily available in India. Smells so good!
    Enjoy.
    Have a very merry Christmas and a happy new 2008. I will see you after the 1st!:))

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  2. lovely, lovely!! You already know I love such puddings. And that's such a beautiful photo.

    Merry Christmas, Susan. I hope that you and your family will have a wonderful day and also best wishes for 2008.

    x Nora

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  3. Nice. I think we call this Phirni - sometimes it's served in earthen saucers. The trick with rose essence is to use the barest minimum, I think, otherwise the smell can haunt you for years :)

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  4. Truly lovely photographs, and the recipe sounds wonderful. Your images are always so well done.

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  5. Looks so delicious, great shot too!

    Thank you for your participation in SHF.

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  6. Really gorgeous pictures, and I'm sure it tastes delicious! I love rose in food.

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  7. Ooo ... I'd totally forgotten how much I love this! Thanks for reminding me, Susan :)

    I love the idea of adding rose petals, sounds really refreshing.

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  8. wow, that looks really pretty Susan:) kheer is such a favored dessert in india as its a no-frills one..your presentation looks very beautiful:)

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  9. Susan, lovie ~ Yes, I've seen this recipe and thought of making it. I hesitate because of the rice part...I've never been any good with rice puddings. That the rice is ground, though, should tempt me into trying this. And the addition of rose water is always sine qua non. I especially love the vibrancy of your garnishes - chartreuse and pink, the new black and gold.

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  10. Oh, that looks terrific... and your photos are absolutely beautiful.

    Ann

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  11. Lovely photos and a very interesting recipe.

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  12. Thanks, Asha. I love rosewater in everything that I can get away with adding it to. Floral flavors are my very favorites. I can get several kinds of waters fairly easily. My cupboard is never empty of them.
    --
    Hi, Nora. Thanks. I'm sure you would love this. You can also use coconut milk rather than standard diary. I'll bet it's heady stuff.
    --
    Sra -- Thanks. Saucers sound like a very pretty touch. I'm afraid I am very heavy handed w/ the rosewater -- love it! My bad. ; )
    --
    Hi, Laurie! Thanks! I'm glad you enjoy my photos.
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    Thanks, Zorra. I was happy to fit SHF into my crazy December schedule. Pudding is a great theme. Thanks for hosting!
    --
    Rosa -- Thanks. Given our shared love of violet, I knew you would take a fancy to this, too.
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    Hi, KayKat! Good to see you! Life's sweets are always worth remembering. Thanks for your visit.
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    Thanks, Mansi. Kheer's such a great dessert, all those special flavors: rose, cardamom, pistachio...and basmati really takes it over the top. I am not a huge fan of traditional American rice pudding, but "exotic" recipes win me over every time.
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    Thanks, Shaun. I'm not good w/ typical rice pudding, either, but the ground rice is quite a different animal. The ground almonds and rosewater made it hard to resist.

    I was pretty fond of the colors, too. Red and green are a seasonal standard, so I went for their lighter and brighter hues.
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    Hi, Ann! Thanks very much!
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    Thank you, Simona. This is one of my favorite pretty posts.

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  13. beautiful dessert, lovely pics! reminds me of the north Indian dessert called 'phirni', rice pwd and milk being the common thread. I've seen people use fruit flavorings these days in such desserts. btw do u add lime juice after cooling?
    Best Wishes for 2008, dear Susan!

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  14. Hi, Richa! Thank you! I've had phirni and kheer. You are right; there is a similarity. Phirni is very good with mixed fruit in it.

    Yes, I did add the lime juice last.
    Thanks for your well wishes. Hope you are enjoying the earliest days of your new year.

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  15. That's a lovely dessert - and beautifully photographed!

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  16. That is simply stunning looking! What a show-stopper of a dessert!

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  17. That looks awesome Susan! rose adds a great flavor and fragrance to desserts; but I'm intrigued with the lime juice..doesn't it "curdle" the milk?

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  18. Thank you, Suzana!
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    Thanks, Sweet and Saucy! It was a very easy dessert to make.
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    Hi, Mansi. Thanks. I love rosewater in just about everything. No, the lime juice doesn't curdle; I suspect it's b/c there isn't that much and it is added last which means less exposure overall to the mixture. If the juice went directly into plain milk, there would be a problem. Good to see you.

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